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Public Recycling Drop-Off

What and How to Recycle at the Drop-Off

Screen Shot 2016-02-23 at 12.44.30 PMThe Public Drop-Off is located at 2121 Stephenson Drive dock 24 and is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All recyclable materials must be sorted according to the guide below, and/or the stickers located on each recycling bin.

If you have questions about whether or not something you would like to bring to the drop off is recyclable, email recycle@utk.edu or call (865) 974-3480.


Plastic

IMG_5990Why Recycle: Creating new plastics accounts for 7 percent of worldwide usage of fossil fuels. The purpose of plastic containers is to be chemically inert to the material it contains, which makes them virtually non-biodegradable. Thus, plastics continue to pollute surface waters and break into smaller and smaller pieces. They eventually end up in the oceans, where large eddy currents collect and concentrate the debris, negatively affecting sea life.

What to Recycle: Clean Plastics labeled 1-7 (excluding #6 Styrofoam or EPS), Clean Plastic Bottles, Clean Plastic Cups, Clean Plastic Milk Jugs, Clean Plastic Detergent Containers

What is NOT Accepted: Dirty Plastic (NO FOOD), Chips/Candy Wrappers, Styrofoam

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Clean Plastic ONLY”


Paper

IMG_6016Why Recycle: Recycling one ton of office paper saves 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 463 gallons of oil, 3 cubic yards of landfill space, and enough energy to heat an average home for six months!

What to Recycle: Office Paper, Newspaper, Hardback Books, Journals, Paper with tape or staples, Spiral Bound Notebooks, Phone Books, Catalogs, Envelopes

What is NOT Accepted: Paper Board*, Paper Cups, Paper Plates, Paper Towels, Food and Beverage Containers

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Paper ONLY”

*Place in designated bin.

Cardboard

Why Recycle: About 90 percent of all products shipped worldwide are shipped in cardboard containers. As is it a paper product and there are a limited number of trees, recycling cardboard is not only lucrative but essential to maintaining an environmental equilibrium. Recycling cardboard saves 50 percent of greenhouse emissions compared with new cardboard.

What to Recycle: Corrugated cardboard (the thick wavy kind), clean pizza boxes with no food, shipping and packing boxes

What is NOT Accepted: Very waxy cardboard, cardboard with food contamination, paperboard (cereal boxes, food containers)

Where to Recycle: “Cardboard Only” dumpster at Public Drop Off



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Glass

Why Recycle: One ton of recycled glass saves 42 Kwh of energy, 0.12 barrels of oil (5 gallons), 714,000 Btu’s of energy, 7.5 pounds of air pollutants from being released, and 2 cubic yards of landfill space. Over 30% of the raw material used in glass production now comes from recycled glass.

What to Recycle: Clean Green, Brown & Clear Glass Bottles and Jars

What is NOT Accepted: Lids, Lab Glass, Sheet Glass, Pyrex, Dirty Glass, Light bulbs (NO LIQUIDS OR FOOD)

Where to Recycle: Containers marked Clean Green, Clean Brown & Clean Clear Glass ONLY. Please separate based on glass color. Metal lids can be placed in the “Scrap Metal Only” bin.


Plastic Film/Bags

IMG_6021Why Recycle: Plastic bags are created with oil. The more we recycle, the less raw materials are used to produce more plastic bags.

What to Recycle: Soft Plastics Labeled #2 & #4, Clean/Dry Grocery, Retail, Newspaper, Dry Cleaning, Bread, Produce, & Other Plastics Bags, Plastic Film, Plastic Product Wrap (paper towel wrappers), Furniture & Electronic Wrap, Plastic Cereal Box Liners (except if they tear like paper), Zip Close Food Storage Bags, Plastic Shipping Envelopes, Bubble Wrap, Deflated Air Pillows

What is NOT Accepted: Foamy Plastics, Bags with Food Residue, Wet/Damp Bags, Bags with Silver Lining, Candy Wrappers, Chip Bags, Frozen Food Bags,             Pre-washed Salad Bags, Pet Food Bags, Bedding Bags

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Plastic Film/Bags”


Aluminum Beverage Cans

IMG_5986Why Recycle: Throwing away a single can is like pouring out six ounces of gasoline. Creating a can from recycled aluminum uses 95 percent less energy than creating one from virgin materials. An aluminum can has no limit to how many times it can be recycled, and the average life cycle of a can is under sixty days.

What to Recycle: Clean Aluminum BEVERAGE cans

What is NOT Accepted: Aluminum Foil, Baking Pans

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Aluminum Cans Only”


Steel Cans

IMG_6003Why Recycle: All metal cans are infinitely recyclable. One ton of recycled steel saves 642 Kwh of energy, 1.8 barrels of oil, 10.9 million Btu’s of energy, and 4 cubic yards of landfill space.

What to Recycle: Clean Steel Food Containers, Clean Pet Food Containers, Steel/Aluminum Lids

What is NOT Accepted: Aluminum Cans* (place these in aluminum bin)

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Steel Cans Only”


Electronic Waste

IMG_6015Why Recycle: Electronic waste is a rapidly growing constituent of the waste stream. It contains many valuable recoverable metals and toxic and hazardous materials.

What to Recycle: Electronic Items, Cell Phones, Printers, Chargers, CDs, Cords, Computer Monitors, Computer Hardrives, Video Games, VHS, Cassette Tapes, Laptops

What is NOT Accepted: Televisions, Refrigerators, Smoke Detectors, Fluorescent Lightbulbs

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Electronic Waste Only or E-Waste Only”


Scrap Metal

IMG_5997Why Recycle: Recycling scrap metal means using less newly mined metal, equating to less mining and damage to the environment. Some metals, such as copper, aluminum, lead, nickel and zinc can be recycled infinite amount of times.

What to Recycle: Steel, Iron, Aluminum Scrap, Clean Copper, Stainless Steel, Brass Keys, Brass Doorknobs

What is NOT Accepted: Chemicals, Drums

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Scrap Metal Only”


Printer/Toner Cartridges

IMG_6000Why Recycle: Each year 375 million empty printer & toner cartridges are thrown away with most ending up in landfills or incinerators.

What to Recycle: Printer and Toner Cartridges

What is NOT Accepted: Printers*

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Toner and Printer Cartridges Only”

*Please place in designated bin.


Rechargeable Batteries

IMG_6011Why Recycle: Batteries contain heavy metals and toxic and corrosive chemicals. These materials can leach into the water supply, where they are difficult and costly to clean up. Battery materials are also expensive, and recycling helps to keep costs down as recovery is more economical than mining.

What to Recycle: Lithium-ion Batteries, Sealed Lead Acid (Car) Batteries, Cellphone Batteries, Computer Batteries, Power Tool Batteries, Ni-MH Batteries

What is NOT Accepted: Alkaline Batteries*, Single Use Batteries*

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Rechargeable Batteries Only”

*Please place in designated bin.


Single Use Batteries

IMG_6001Why Recycle: Batteries contain heavy metals and toxic and corrosive chemicals. These materials can leach into the water supply, where they are difficult and costly to clean up. Battery materials are also expensive, and recycling helps to keep costs down as recovery is more economical than mining.

What to Recycle: Alkaline Batteries, Button-Cell Batteries, Lithium Batteries

What is NOT Accepted: Rechargeable Batteries*

Where to Recycle: Containers marked “Single Use Batteries Only”

*Please place in designated bin.


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